Articles about a wide variety of subjects in classical Chinese medicine.

Etymological Analysis of the Defining Quote on the Lung Official in Chapter Eight of the Huangdi neijing suwen (肺者,相傅之官,治節出焉)

2021-03-19T17:55:07-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , |

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


A collection of classical texts are used etymologically to define the symbolic significance of the language in Huangdi neijing suwenChapter Eight, the defining quote about the lung organ network.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Developing the Core Essence of Chinese Medical Science: An Interview With Liu Changlin

2017-02-20T15:52:53-08:00Tags: , , , , |

WITH LIU CHANGLIN
Chinese Academy of Social Science,
Department of Philosophy


TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

In these translated excerpts from a comprehensive interview, one of China’s leading theorists explores the philosophical differences between Eastern and Western modes of thinking, and how they shaped two distinct systems of medicine: Chinese medicine, described as a medicine of time, and Western medicine, described as a medicine of space.

FROM THE ESSAY COLLECTION LIU CHANGLIN: CHINESE MEDICINE: PHILOSOPHICAL VIEWS ON THE PROFESSIONS

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Three Yin and Three Yang: Clarifying Zhang Zhongjing’s Diagnostic Approach of the Six Conformations

2019-06-11T21:30:07-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

BY YARON SEIDMAN
Hunyuan Institute

Our associate is an accomplished Chinese medicine physician and emerging scholar on the classical aspects of TCM. His studies with his mentor, Dr. Liu Lihong, have led him to specialize in the six conformation system of Chinese diagnostics introduced in the Shanghan lun. He is presently writing a book on treating infertility with Chinese herbs, wherein he is discussing his thoughts on the deeper meaning of the "three yin and three yang" system. He has allowed us to a preview parts of the book in the Associates Forum—a must read for everyone interested in six conformation theory.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

The Superior Physician: Medical Practice As Seen Through the Yijing’s Junzi (2 Parts)

2017-04-01T18:55:21-07:00Tags: , , |

BY SUZANNA LOWBEER

Our associate has contributed this two-part research paper to our collection of work as an abbreviated version of a project that garnered the Best Thesis award during her academic tenure. These articles describe the role of the junzi by the Yijing as a person who recognizes himself as an instrument of heaven, and whose main purpose is to help others using diagnostic and treatment knowledge, by integrating with the community he[she] serves, and by illustrating to other healers the importance of spiritual cultivation in one's practice.

Clinical Realizations of a Chinese Medicine Physician: The Principle of Supporting Yang (2 Parts)

2017-04-01T18:55:51-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

BY LU CHONGHAN
Assistant Professor, Department of Fundamental Studies, Chengdu Universty of TCM; Lineage Holder of the “Fire Spirit” School of Sichuan herbalism

TRANSLATED BY KENDRA DALE

In this passionate lecture, the main successor of the Sichuan “Fire Spirit” school of aconite, ginger, and cinnamon usage reveals the clinical secrets of his herbal lineage. In an unveiled challenge to the textbook parameters of TCM, Dr. Lu contents that support of yang-qi must override most superficial symptoms of heat and yin deficiency.

LECTURE TRANSCRIPTS

The Principle of Supporting Yang

2017-04-01T18:56:03-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY LU CHONGHAN
Assistant Professor, Department of Fundamental Studies, Chengdu Universty of TCM; Lineage Holder of the “Fire Spirit” School of Sichuan herbalism

TRANSLATED BY KENDRA DALE

In this recently published transmission, the main successor of the Sichuan “Fire Spirit” school of aconite, ginger, and cinnamon usage issues a rare manifesto of the leading role of yang-qi in macrocosm and microcosm. In a challenge to the textbook parameters of TCM, Dr. Lu contents that support of this precious yang is one of the hallmarks of classical Chinese medicine, which must override most superficial symptoms of heat and yin deficiency.

LECTURE TRANSCRIPT

Chinese Medicine In Crisis: Science, Politics, and the Making of “TCM”

2019-04-27T22:22:14-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


This article is based on the conviction that the traditional art of Oriental medicine is dying—both in mainland China, home of the mother trunk of the field, and consequently overseas where branches of the tree are trying to grow. It may be an anachronistic piece, written at a time when TCM administrators around the world are celebrating major advances in the field, such as increasing numbers of students, practitioners, patients, colleges, universities, and hospitals, which all appear to reflect a booming state of Oriental medicine.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY SEPP LEEB

Selections from Shan Yutang, Annotated Excerpts from the Shanghan Lun With Suggestions for Acupuncture and Moxibustion Therapy (1984): “Shaoyang”

2017-04-01T18:56:27-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , |

BY SHAN YUTANG

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

One of modern China’s last masters of acupuncture interprets shaoyang function and provides a model for transforming Shanghan lun information into elegant point prescriptions.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Reflections on the Relationship of Traditional Wisdom, Precision, and Clinical Efficacy in the Herbal Science of Chinese Medicine (2 Parts)

2017-04-01T18:56:32-07:00Tags: , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


This essay represents Heiner’s contribution to 2011’s Fuyang suntan (Discussion Forum on Supporting the Yang), China’s premier conference dedicated to upholding the roots of classical Chinese medicine. He notes the enormous transformative potential that natural medicine holds in the precarious times we live in, and underscores the importance of clinical efficacy in the process of promoting our medicine. In particular, he points out the importance of the “technological” details of the clinical encounter in Chinese medicine, which have been the basis for optimum clinical results in the past. In Part 2, he shares some aspects of his personal journey toward mastering the details of precise herb prescribing.

ENGLISH / GERMAN / CHINESE
GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

All Disease Comes From the Heart: The Pivotal Role of the Emotions in Classical Chinese Medicine

2017-05-10T21:09:36-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Most modern clinicians find that a majority of their patients suffer from the symptom complex generally referred to as “stress.” Emotional stress, however, is usually regarded as a confounding rather than a causative factor in pathophysiology. This assessment is contrary to the tenets of classical Chinese medicine, which originally regarded emotional imbalance as a spiritual affliction of primary significance. While ancient Chinese philosophy considered emotional sensibility as our greatest asset in the process of fulfilling human destiny, it also regarded human temperaments as our greatest liability due to vast pathogenetic potential.

Gancao Xiexin Tang (Licorice Purge the Heart Decoction): A Forgotten Key Remedy For the Treatment of Toxic Skin Conditions

2017-04-01T18:57:06-07:00Tags: , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Gancao Xiexin Tang was first recorded by the Han physician Zhang Zhongjing about 1,800 years ago. Both Shanghan lun and Jingui yaolüe, the now separated parts of his classic guidebook on herbal formulas (Shanghan zabing lun), cite this particular formula. In modern times, this formula is usually regarded as a variation of the widely used Pinellia Purge the Heart Decoction (Banxia Xiexin Tang) and thus most often prescribed as a remedy for Banxia Xiexin Tang symptom complex (discomfort in stomach area, belching, diarrhea). This is precisely the usage suggested for this remedy in the Shanghai lan, where Gancao Xiexin Tang and Shengjiang Xiexin Tang are listed as variations of the standard Banxia Xiexin Tang.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Lyme Disease: An In-Depth Interview with Heiner Fruehauf

2021-03-23T18:31:47-07:00Tags: , , , , , , |

WITH HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


INTERVIEW BY BOB QUINN,
WITH ERIN MORELAND

In the spring of 2011 Heiner Fruehauf, PhD, LAc sat down with his student and colleague, Bob Quinn, DAOM, LAc to discuss the finer points of “Brain Gu” syndrome, specifically as it pertains to the treatment of Lyme Disease. This discussion is best understood as a follow-up to and elaboration of the ideas presented in Heiner and Quinn’s earlier interview about Gu syndrome published in the fall of 2008 and available in the public part of this website.

Yang Tianhui: Notes from My Visit to the Fuzi Growing Area of Zhangming County

2017-04-01T18:57:33-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY YANG TIANHUI
Song Dynasty (1039 CE)

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

The following text represents the most detailed pre-modern description of the traditional cultivation of medicinal aconite in China. It was written more than 900 years ago by a Sichuanese official in charge of Zhangming County. Zhangming is situated in the location of today’s Jiangyou County, epicenter of the recent Sichuan earthquake, which has been identified by all ancient materia medica experts as the only place where genuine Chinese aconite should be sourced from.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Traditional Chinese Approaches to Gu Syndrome: Two 18th Century Examples

2021-03-23T18:32:33-07:00Tags: , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Heiner Fruehauf has researched the ancient symbolism that defines the finer points of Chinese organ network function for 10 years. His prolific research project will eventually culminate in the creation of an illustrated compendium on the macrocosmic and microcosmic ramifications of organ network theory. Since the publication of this effort is still years away, he has decided to make a selection from his cache of existing research papers available now by publishing them on ClassicalChineseMedicine.org. The first installment of these papers consists of a detailed etymological analysis of the character of fei 肺 (lung), and the defining statement on the lung’s function/office in chapter 8 of the Huangdi neijing suwen.

Thunder Pearls – An Effective Chinese Herbal Treatment for Chronic Parasitism

2021-03-24T12:44:14-07:00Tags: , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

This from a series of transcripts of video lectures from ClassicalPearls.org, the site for herbal formulas based on over thirty years of clinical and academic research by Prof. Heiner Fruehauf. Thunder Pearls Chinese herbal formula is a unique remedy for the important clinical phenomenon of “Abdominal Gu Syndrome”: difficult and treatment resistant diseases caused by chronic, often undiagnosable parasitic infections of the digestive system. This formulation, as Dr. Fruehauf presents, is sourced from ancient Daoist medicine texts and personally proven many times in modern clinical practice.This statement has not been evaluated by the FDA.

REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION FROM CLASSICAL PEARLS HERBAL FORMULAS

Fuxing Jue and Tangye Jing Translation Project: Preface

2020-01-04T15:00:59-08:00Tags: , , , , |

TRANSLATED BY MICHAEL DELL'ORFANO

EDITED AND CRITICALLY ANNOTATED
BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

The Hermit says: Every student of the Dao and all seekers of longevity must first learn how to expel disease. Practitioners often suffer from chronic health problems or acute manifestations of seasonal illnesses. In this case, one needs to first employ the systematic methods of tonifying or reducing the five zang organs by imbibing several doses of herbal medicine.

Introducing the Fuxing jue (Extraneous Secrets) and Tangye jing (Decoction Classic) Translation Project

2020-09-17T14:50:57-07:00Tags: , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Chinese herbal formulas are typically distinguished as jingfang (classical remedies) or shifang (contemporary remedies). During the last millennium, the origin of all classical formulas has generally been attributed to the Shanghan zabing lan (Treatise on Cold Damage Disorders and Miscellaneous Diseases), Chinese medicine’s seminal work on the systematic categorization of disease patterns and corresponding formulas by the Han dynasty scholar-physician Zhang Zhongjing (150-219 ACE). Historical sources reveal, however, that at least eleven classical herb primers (jingfang) existed before Zhang’s birth.

A New Translation of the Classic of Filial Love (Xiaojing 孝經)

2017-04-01T19:20:54-07:00Tags: , , , |

TRANSLATION AND COMMENTARY BY SABINE WILMS
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


One of the best translators of classical Chinese medicine texts has generously agreed to share her recent translation of this core classic of Confucian thinking, human interaction, and medical ethics. We offer it for complete download together with an announcement of the 3rd Shan Ren Dao Retreat in the West. The Retreat introduces the 5-element teachings of the 19th century peasant saint Wang Fengyi as a practical way to bring the wisdom of the Xiaojing into modern everyday life.

The Lung and the Tiger Image: An Example of Decoding the Symbolic Record of Chinese Medicine

2017-04-01T19:26:22-07:00Tags: , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Heiner Fruehauf has researched the ancient symbolism that defines the finer points of Chinese organ network function for 10 years. His prolific research project will eventually culminate in the creation of an illustrated compendium on the macrocosmic and microcosmic ramifications of organ network theory. Since the publication of this effort is still years away, he has decided to make a selection from his cache of existing research papers available now by publishing them on ClassicalChineseMedicine.org. The first installment of these papers consists of a detailed etymological analysis of the character of fei 肺 (lung), and the defining statement on the lung’s function/office in chapter 8 of the Huangdi neijing suwen.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

A Die Aufzeichung vom Luofluss

2017-04-01T19:27:43-07:00Tags: , , , , , , |

BY LIU YIMING
(18th century)

For our German speaking audience, Liu is the most influential Daoist writer and commentator in the last 500 years. He is known for translating some of the esoteric and highly symbolic concepts of Daoism into clear language. His commentary on the River Map is a vital piece for the understanding of yin/yang and Five Phase Element theory.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY BENJAMIN WITT

Cosmological Thought in China and Europe: Introduction, Yin & Yang

2020-09-17T15:06:16-07:00Tags: , , , , |

BY FRANK FIEDELER
Translated into English by Gabriel Weiss

This original translation is the introduction and first chapter from the volume Yin und Yang (Yin and Yang), by the late Prof. Frank Fiedeler, one of the best modern interpreters of the Yijing, and is one of the few scholars who have made the symbolic methodology of Han and pre-Han dynasty thought accessible for the field of Chinese medicine.

Image and Script

2020-09-17T15:06:10-07:00Tags: , , , |

BY FRANK FIEDELER
Translated into English by Gabriel Weiss

This original translation is the second chapter from the volume Yin und Yang (Yin and Yang), by the late Prof. Frank Fiedeler, one of the best modern interpreters of the Yijing, and is one of the few scholars who have made the symbolic methodology of Han and pre-Han dynasty thought accessible for the field of Chinese medicine.

Excerpts from Zhang Xichun’s Materia Medica, in Chinese at Heart But Western Where Appropriate: Essays Investigating an Integrated Form of Medicine (Yixue Zhong Zhong Can Xi Lu, 1933)

2021-03-26T12:24:02-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

BY ZHANG XICHUN
(1960-1933)

INTRODUCED AND TRANSLATED
BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

This original translation explores the clinical efficacy of twelve important Chinese herbs, and gives an example of the highly personal and narrative way in which scholar clinicians used to relate to medicinal plants in the past. Selected from the herbal compendium of one of the last master physicians of the classical era of Chinese medicine.