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Daoist Medicine and Qigong 2016-12-21T17:49:35+00:00

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Daoist Medicine and Qigong

av-daoistmedThis section is dedicated to the transmission of knowledge from the taproot system of Chinese medicine–the nature based approach to healing that includes shamanism, alchemy and ancient hermit practices. It contains diagnostic and treatment information that is generally only transmitted in the context of the traditional teacher/disciple relationship, and can be found nowhere else.

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Daoist Medicine and Qigong

Wang Qingyu

Sichuan Academy of Cultural History, Department of Martial Arts and Nourishing Life

Medicine and the Dao: New Reflections on the Relationship Between Two Vital Aspects of Chinese Culture (3 Parts)

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts and Nourishing Life


HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine

Total running time: 58 mins. (Part 1)
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf

After a similar lecture series Daoist Medicine: the Alchemical and Shamanic Root of Chinese Medicine that we offered 10 years ago, Prof. Wang Qingyu, China's premier expert of Daoist medicine and the ancient science of nourishing life is back with us at the ripe age of 80 to give us another round of reflections on his favorite topic.

The Five Elemental Sounds and the Power of Internal Alchemy

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts and Nourishing Life

Total running time: 60 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

Wang Qingyu, professor at the Sichuan Academy of Cultural Science and lineage holder of the Jinjing style of Qigong, speaks on the vibrational aspects of Chinese medicine by introducing the five pentatonic sounds of Chinese music in a medical context. From a cultivational perspective, he talks about how to work with the five sounds within the body during Qigong meditation.

The Bagua in Your Hand: Practical Applications of Daoist Medicine (2 Parts)

WANG QINQYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts and Nourishing Life

Total running time: 73 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

In these presentations, a follow-up to last year’s 4-part series The Alchemical and Shamanic Root of Chinese Medicine, China’s premier expert on the Daoist origins of Chinese medicine introduces the basic parameters of palm diagnosis.

Daoist Medicine: The Alchemical and Shamanic Root of Chinese Medicine (4 Parts)

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts and Nourishing Life

Total running time: 258 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

In these informative presentations, China’s premier expert of Daoist medicine and the ancient science of nourishing life gives an enlightening account of the ancient roots of Chinese Medicine and an overview of some of the primary healing modalities of Daoist Medicine.

On Cultivation and the Spirit of Chinese Medicine

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts and Nourishing Life

Total running time: 77 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

In this lively presentation, China’s premier expert of Daoist medicine and the ancient science of nourishing life gives a highly personal account of the role of personal cultivation and the acquisition of practitioner knowledge in the traditional teacher–disciple relationship.

Jinjing Shisi Shi—The 14 Movements of the Jinjing School of Qigong

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts and Nourishing Life

Total running time: 56 mins.
English

In this presentation, with assistance from Heiner Fruehauf, Wang Qingyu, professor at the Sichuan Academy of Cultural Science and lineage holder of the Jinjing style of Qigong, demonstrates the Jinjing Shisi Shi—The 14 Movements of the Jinjing School of Qigong. (English)

The Role of Fasting in Chinese Medicine: A Comprehensive Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Bigu (2 parts)

LIU LIHONG
Institute for the Clinical Research of Classical Chinese Medicine, Guangxi University of TCM
Total running time: 100 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

The practice of fasting for cleansing and longevity purposes used to play an important role in the hygiene rituals of Daoist medicine. In this presentation, one of China's leading China's experts on the forgotten modalities of classical Chinese medicine introduces a traditional fasting system from a lineage healing with "bigu" in mainland China.

The Science of Longevity: Reconsidering a Key Concept of Chinese Medicine (2 Parts)

HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine

Total running time: 118 mins.
English

In this richly illustrated lecture, Prof. Fruehauf will explore the time-honored concept of longevity from a Chinese medicine perspective, drawing from classical texts, ancient symbolism, and parallel developments in modern research.

The Dao of Healing (2 Parts)

ABBOT FU YUANFA
Yuntai Guan Monastery, Sichuan, China
Total running time: 127 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

Daoist medicine is the mysterious precursor of Chinese medicine, a vast yet barely researched field of traditional medical science. Abbot Fu Yuanfa of the Yuntai Guan monastery in Sichuan gives a lively account of his medical and spiritual studies with his master, the legendary master healer Li Zhenguo. He outlines the importance of personal cultivation and intention in healing, as well as several profound yet simple principles for treating with herbs.