Yin Yang: A Deeper Look at the Core of Chinese Medicine System Science

2021-04-14T14:00:07-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , |

HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine

Total running time: approx. 2 hrs.

Chinese medicine, at its core, is all about yin-yang. While recognition of this concept has by now entered into most non-Chinese languages, the cosmological depth and medical relevance of this most ancient of Chinese diagnostic systems remains nebulous. This two-part presentation represents Prof. Fruehauf’s approach to the concept and medical ramifications of yin-yang for an audience of Chinese medicine professionals.

Clinical Realizations of a Chinese Medicine Physician: The Principle of Supporting Yang (2 Parts)

2017-04-01T18:55:51-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

BY LU CHONGHAN
Assistant Professor, Department of Fundamental Studies, Chengdu Universty of TCM; Lineage Holder of the “Fire Spirit” School of Sichuan herbalism

TRANSLATED BY KENDRA DALE

In this passionate lecture, the main successor of the Sichuan “Fire Spirit” school of aconite, ginger, and cinnamon usage reveals the clinical secrets of his herbal lineage. In an unveiled challenge to the textbook parameters of TCM, Dr. Lu contents that support of yang-qi must override most superficial symptoms of heat and yin deficiency.

LECTURE TRANSCRIPTS

The Principle of Supporting Yang

2017-04-01T18:56:03-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY LU CHONGHAN
Assistant Professor, Department of Fundamental Studies, Chengdu Universty of TCM; Lineage Holder of the “Fire Spirit” School of Sichuan herbalism

TRANSLATED BY KENDRA DALE

In this recently published transmission, the main successor of the Sichuan “Fire Spirit” school of aconite, ginger, and cinnamon usage issues a rare manifesto of the leading role of yang-qi in macrocosm and microcosm. In a challenge to the textbook parameters of TCM, Dr. Lu contents that support of this precious yang is one of the hallmarks of classical Chinese medicine, which must override most superficial symptoms of heat and yin deficiency.

LECTURE TRANSCRIPT

A Synthesis of liujing bianzheng (Six Conformation Diagnostics) and the Practical Application of Shanghan lun Formulas (3 Parts)

2021-03-19T16:37:50-07:00Tags: , , , , |

ZENG RONGXIU
Five Branches University; National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine

Total running time: 178 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf

Dr. Zeng was a veteran physician from Chengdu (Sichuan) who specialized in the treatment of difficult and recalcitrant diseases with herbal formulas from the Shanghan lan and Jingui yaolüe. The simplicity of his clinical approach, combined with the fervent belief that all disease can be healed with natural methods, transmit the core essence of the practical aspects of classical Chinese medicine. Until his passing in 2014, he was living in retirement in Los Angeles and continued to teach students at Five Branches University and the College of Classical Chinese Medicine at National University of Natural Medicine.

Principles and Persuasions in Chinese Medicine Diagnosis – Selected Readings

2017-04-01T19:51:14-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY VARIOUS AUTHORS

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Prior to the process of treating disease, the sage (superior doctor) must be able to distinguish the Yin and Yang of Heaven and Earth. S/he must know the rhythmic flow of the four seasons and the intricate relationships between the five organ networks and the six bowel systems. S/he must be able to distinguish the Yin/Yang and exterior/interior quality of the meridians, and know what kind of diseases to treat with acupuncture, what kind with moxibustion, and what kind with herbs.

INDIVIDUAL MONOPGRAPHS

Han Fa – The Sweating (diaphoretic) Method

2017-02-20T13:00:13-08:00Tags: , , , , , |

BY CHENG GUOPENG
Scholar, Qing Dynasty

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Cheng Guopeng is one of the seminal scholar-physicians of the early Qing dynasty. At the height of his career, he synthesized his personal insights derived from a life-long study of the classics, especially Zhang Zhongjing’s Shanghan lun, and his clinical experience by writing the book Enlightened Insights into the Science of Medicine (Yixue xinwu, 1732). This thin yet influential work first spelled out the system of the so-called Eight Parameters (bagang) and the Eight Treatment Methods (bafa), which since have become the standard diagnostic parameters of Chinese medicine. His introduction to the “Sweating Method” (Hanfa) is an excellent example for the original depth and attention to detail which ancient master physicians brought to their craft.