Chinese Medicine for COVID-19: A Summary of Successful Treatment Approaches Used in China (video)

2021-03-23T15:12:32-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , |

LIVE VIDEO PRESENTATION

WITH HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
School of Classical Chinese Medicine

In this 90 minute video lecture, Heiner Fruehauf summarizes the successful Chinese herbal medicine treatment approaches for COVID-19 based on first hand knowledge by physicians on the front line of the epidemic in China like Dr. Liu Lihong.

Etymological Analysis of the Defining Quote on the Lung Official in Chapter Eight of the Huangdi neijing suwen (肺者,相傅之官,治節出焉)

2021-03-19T17:55:07-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , |

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


A collection of classical texts are used etymologically to define the symbolic significance of the language in Huangdi neijing suwenChapter Eight, the defining quote about the lung organ network.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

The Six Conformations (liujing): Reflections by a Shanghan Expert (2 Parts)

2021-06-11T15:48:36-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , |

LIU LIHONG
Institute for the Clinical Research of Classical Chinese Medicine, Guangxi University of TCM

The organization of the 12 organ systems into 3 yang pairs and 3 yin pairs and the associated system of six conformation diagnostics (liujing bianzheng) remains one of the less explored areas of contemporary Chinese medicine. Twenty five years ago, Dr. Liu Lihong wrote one of China's first doctoral dissertations in the field of Chinese medicine on the six conformation approach to diagnosis and therapy. Since then, he has become known for his deep and clinically relevant lectures on this classical system that was first outlined in the Neijing and Shanghan lan.

Total running time: 112 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf

Clinical Realizations of a Chinese Medicine Physician: The Principle of Supporting Yang (2 Parts)

2017-04-01T18:55:51-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

BY LU CHONGHAN
Assistant Professor, Department of Fundamental Studies, Chengdu Universty of TCM; Lineage Holder of the “Fire Spirit” School of Sichuan herbalism

TRANSLATED BY KENDRA DALE

In this passionate lecture, the main successor of the Sichuan “Fire Spirit” school of aconite, ginger, and cinnamon usage reveals the clinical secrets of his herbal lineage. In an unveiled challenge to the textbook parameters of TCM, Dr. Lu contents that support of yang-qi must override most superficial symptoms of heat and yin deficiency.

LECTURE TRANSCRIPTS

The Principle of Supporting Yang

2017-04-01T18:56:03-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY LU CHONGHAN
Assistant Professor, Department of Fundamental Studies, Chengdu Universty of TCM; Lineage Holder of the “Fire Spirit” School of Sichuan herbalism

TRANSLATED BY KENDRA DALE

In this recently published transmission, the main successor of the Sichuan “Fire Spirit” school of aconite, ginger, and cinnamon usage issues a rare manifesto of the leading role of yang-qi in macrocosm and microcosm. In a challenge to the textbook parameters of TCM, Dr. Lu contents that support of this precious yang is one of the hallmarks of classical Chinese medicine, which must override most superficial symptoms of heat and yin deficiency.

LECTURE TRANSCRIPT

On the Relationship Between Medicine and Philosophy

2019-04-27T22:22:16-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , |

BY ZHANG XICHUN
(1860-1933)

TRANSLATED AND INTRODUCED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Zhang Xichun (1860-1933) is one of China's great scholar-physicians. He is primarily remembered for his prominent role in spearheading the early movement of Chinese-Western medicine integration during the first three decades of this century. The depth of his knowledge and the broad range of his activities, moreover, distinguish him as one of the last of the classical cast of renaissance physicians..

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Reflections on the Relationship of Traditional Wisdom, Precision, and Clinical Efficacy in the Herbal Science of Chinese Medicine (2 Parts)

2017-04-01T18:56:32-07:00Tags: , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


This essay represents Heiner’s contribution to 2011’s Fuyang suntan (Discussion Forum on Supporting the Yang), China’s premier conference dedicated to upholding the roots of classical Chinese medicine. He notes the enormous transformative potential that natural medicine holds in the precarious times we live in, and underscores the importance of clinical efficacy in the process of promoting our medicine. In particular, he points out the importance of the “technological” details of the clinical encounter in Chinese medicine, which have been the basis for optimum clinical results in the past. In Part 2, he shares some aspects of his personal journey toward mastering the details of precise herb prescribing.

ENGLISH / GERMAN / CHINESE
GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

All Disease Comes From the Heart: The Pivotal Role of the Emotions in Classical Chinese Medicine

2017-05-10T21:09:36-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Most modern clinicians find that a majority of their patients suffer from the symptom complex generally referred to as “stress.” Emotional stress, however, is usually regarded as a confounding rather than a causative factor in pathophysiology. This assessment is contrary to the tenets of classical Chinese medicine, which originally regarded emotional imbalance as a spiritual affliction of primary significance. While ancient Chinese philosophy considered emotional sensibility as our greatest asset in the process of fulfilling human destiny, it also regarded human temperaments as our greatest liability due to vast pathogenetic potential.

The Lung and the Tiger Image: An Example of Decoding the Symbolic Record of Chinese Medicine

2017-04-01T19:26:22-07:00Tags: , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Heiner Fruehauf has researched the ancient symbolism that defines the finer points of Chinese organ network function for 10 years. His prolific research project will eventually culminate in the creation of an illustrated compendium on the macrocosmic and microcosmic ramifications of organ network theory. Since the publication of this effort is still years away, he has decided to make a selection from his cache of existing research papers available now by publishing them on ClassicalChineseMedicine.org. The first installment of these papers consists of a detailed etymological analysis of the character of fei 肺 (lung), and the defining statement on the lung’s function/office in chapter 8 of the Huangdi neijing suwen.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Between Heaven and Earth: Selected Translations from the Classics

2017-04-01T19:41:11-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , |

BY VARIOUS AUTHORS

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

The qi of earth ascends, the qi of heaven descends. In this fashion, yin and yang grind against each other, and heaven and earth merge in undulating embrace. If this setting is vibrated by thunder, excited by wind and rain, moved by the flow of the four seasons, and fondled by the germinating light of sun and moon, the world’s myriad processes of transformation become aroused.

FROM BOOK OF RITES (LI JI), FL. 2ND CENTURY B.C.E.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Fei: An Etymological Analysis of the Pictogram for ‘Lung’

2017-04-01T19:42:47-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


The word 肺, in a more specific reference to the specific function of this organ system, is classified by the component 巿 po (in its seal script form, composed of the pictographic components grass 屮and eight 八), meaning “abundant foliage in the wind” (this is a clear reference to the anatomical appearance of the lung lobes, as well as to traditional descriptions of this organ: Chinese texts describe them as “leaves”; see Shijing: 東門之楊, 其葉肺肺 “The poplars at the Eastern Gate, their leaves flutter lung-like in the wind;” Neijing: 肺熱葉焦 “When the lung is hot, its leaves become charred”); note that the rain forest with its prolific canopy of leaves is considered to be the lung of the earth.

Correlative Cosmology: Energetics of the First Month of Spring and Lung Function

2017-02-19T13:36:59-08:00Tags: , , , , |

COLLATED AND TRANSLATED
BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


In this article of Chinese to English translations, Heiner Fruehauf explores the lung as a metal organ according to the five phase element system. Modern Chinese medicine discourse, therefore, has exclusively focused on this organ’s association with the metal season of fall. In original Neijing cosmology, however, the five phase system is paralleled by a more complex and inclusive system of twelve functional entities that correlate the twelve months of the year with the order of the twelve channel systems that we now refer to as the “organ clock.”

Correlative Cosmology: Energetics of the Second Month of Spring and Large Intestine Function

2017-04-01T19:49:40-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , |

COLLATED AND TRANSLATED
BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

National University of Natural Medicine
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


According to the five phase element system, the large intestine is classified as a metal organ. Modern Chinese medicine discourse, therefore, has exclusively focused on this organ’s association with the metal season of fall. In original Neijing cosmology, however, the five phase system is paralleled by a more complex and inclusive system of twelve functional entities that correlate the twelve months of the year with the order of the twelve channel systems that we now refer to as the “organ clock.”

Principles and Persuasions in Chinese Medicine Diagnosis – Selected Readings

2017-04-01T19:51:14-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY VARIOUS AUTHORS

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Prior to the process of treating disease, the sage (superior doctor) must be able to distinguish the Yin and Yang of Heaven and Earth. S/he must know the rhythmic flow of the four seasons and the intricate relationships between the five organ networks and the six bowel systems. S/he must be able to distinguish the Yin/Yang and exterior/interior quality of the meridians, and know what kind of diseases to treat with acupuncture, what kind with moxibustion, and what kind with herbs.

INDIVIDUAL MONOPGRAPHS

Blood, Blood Stasis, and Blood Path Disorders

2017-04-01T19:52:36-07:00Tags: , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Japanese Kanpo (“Chinese modalities”) medicine has in many ways distinguished itself as an independent school of Oriental medical practice. Although Kanpo practitioners generally derive their inspiration from the Chinese classics, they have developed their own set of diagnostic procedures, therapeutic methods, and medical theories, certain aspects of which vary quite drastically from standard approaches adopted by their colleagues in modern China. To dismiss the Japanese system as an unorthodox branch of Chinese medicine, however, would belittle the age-old Japanese practice of “creative imitation” as baseless esotericism, and miss important aspects of classical Chinese theory that have been preserved and illuminated by the Japanese approach.

Stroke and Post-Stroke Syndrome: Prevention and Treatment by Chinese Herbal Medicine

2017-04-01T19:54:13-07:00Tags: , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


In the Chinese medical tradition, deliberations about the origins and treatment of stroke related conditions span over more than two millennia. Since the condition has traditionally been considered to be one of the "four major problems in internal medicine" (neike si dabing), stroke chapters occupy a prominent place in virtually all of the works that make up the defining body of traditional Chinese medicine.Beginning with the Huangdi Neijing (Inner Canon of the Yellow Emperor), a variety of stroke symptoms were described in great detail, but there was at that time no single label or category which established a concise Chinese term for the condition.

Alcohol Use in Traditional Chinese Formulas

2017-04-01T20:00:20-07:00Tags: , , , |

BY VARIOUS AUTHORS
Translated by Heiner Fruehauf

Prior to the process of treating disease, the sage (superior doctor) must be able to distinguish the Yin and Yang of Heaven and Earth. S/he must know the rhythmic flow of the four seasons and the intricate relationships between the five organ networks and the six bowel systems. S/he must be able to distinguish the Yin/Yang and exterior/interior quality of the meridians, and know what kind of diseases to treat with acupuncture, what kind with moxibustion, and what kind with herbs. S/he must understand the relationship between health and social interaction, master the standard procedure of diagnosis and treatment, and discern the constitutional differences in rich and poor people.

FROM INNER CANON OF THE YELLOW EMPEROR (NEIJING SUWEN, CHAPTER 77: "ANALYZING THE FIVE MISTAKES IN DIAGNOSIS" (FL. 200 B.C.

Skip to content