/Tag:Heiner Fruehauf

The Cosmology and Symbolism of the Twelve Organ Systems of Chinese Medicine

2017-08-26T14:00:57+00:00 Tags: , , , , |

WITH LAURIE REGAN & HEINER FRUEHAUF
Total running time: 28 mins.
English

AUDIO PODCAST

This week, we open the door to a rich understanding that has come from more than a decade of research by a study group led by Heiner. Through excavation of the profound and timeless knowledge held in the ancient Chinese record, this team has uncovered multi-layered, symbolic meaning behind the system of 12 meridians that play a central role in Chinese medicine. Commonly thought of as pathways of qi flow in the body, these meridians, or organ systems, relate to sets of physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual functions in the microcosm of the human body.

The Empress of all the Chinese Organ Networks—the Heart

2017-08-26T14:01:17+00:00 Tags: , , , , |

WITH LAURIE REGAN & HEINER FRUEHAUF
Total running time: 31 mins.
English

AUDIO PODCAST

This week we explore the Heart Organ Network. The primary function associated with Heart in Chinese medicine is to move our awareness in the direction of unity, and enable us to experience true community and connection. Join us as we explore how the ancients conceived of this fundamental role in our human experience, and what their insights have to offer us in today’s increasingly alienating world.

Spirit of the Points: Small Intestine (4 Parts)

2017-09-23T15:53:25+00:00 Tags: , , , , , , |

The great Tang dynasty scholar physician Sun Simiao hinted 1,400 years ago that the secret of understanding the power of the acupuncture points is encoded in their ancient names—a vital piece of information with enormous clinical implications, which has literally been lost in translation. Most Western practitioners of Chinese medicine associate each acupuncture point with an abstract number. This series represents the detailed delivery of goods that was announced last year with the existing video lecture on symbolism of acu-points.

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Why Classical Chinese Medicine is Relevant Today

2017-08-26T14:02:32+00:00 Tags: , , , , , , |

WITH LAURIE REGAN & HEINER FRUEHAUF
Total running time: 28 mins.
English

AUDIO PODCAST

Co-host Laurie Regan interviews Heiner Fruehauf to learn about the basic principles of classical Chinese medicine, and why this ancient knowledge still holds so much relevance for us today.

Many ancient cultures had the practical realization that everything that exists is an inseparable mix of energy and matter, and is interconnected with everything else. Nothing is coincidence. In the realm of medicine, this means that every illness has meaning, and every symptom is a physical marker for the energy and consciousness that forms it. We can learn to read and interpret symptoms to understand the root cause of illness and find true solutions for restoring health.

Medicine and the Dao: New Reflections on the Relationship Between Two Vital Aspects of Chinese Culture (3 Parts)

2017-05-27T14:19:26+00:00 Tags: , , , , , |

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts & Nourishing Life


HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine

Total running time: 3 hrs. 5 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf

After a similar lecture series Daoist Medicine: the Alchemical and Shamanic Root of Chinese Medicine that we offered 10 years ago, Prof. Wang Qingyu, China's premier expert of Daoist medicine and the ancient science of nourishing life is back with us at the ripe age of 80 to give us another round of reflections on his favorite topic.

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Visions of the Baojun: Donald Trump and the Pathological Large Intestine Archetype in Classical Chinese Medicine

2017-09-02T15:11:18+00:00 Tags: , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


This impromptu editorial by Heiner Fruehauf is an attempt to make sense of the recent US presidential elections through the constructive lens of Chinese medicine systems science.

Visionen eines Baojun: Donald Trump und der pathologische Dickdarm-Archetyp in der klassischen chinesischen Medizin

2017-04-01T18:53:10+00:00 Tags: , , , , , |

VON HEINER FRÜHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


DEUTSCHE ÜBERSETZUNG CON BIRGIT ZIEGLER

Diese impromptu Editorial von Heiner Fruehauf ist ein Versuch, Sinn der jüngsten US-Präsidentschaftswahlen durch die konstruktive Linse der chinesischen Medizin Systems Science.

Sacred Chants: Medicine Buddha Chant

2017-09-11T19:06:42+00:00 Tags: , , , |

HEINER FRUEHAUF AND FRIENDS
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine

Total running time: 16 mins.

AUDIO RECORDING

The Yaoshifo Mantra, or Medicine Buddha chant, is from the Chinese Buddhist Chants CD, one of four volumes from Sacred Chants, a beautifully recorded and designed 4 CD box set of over 2 ½ hours of sacred chants collected from spiritual healing communities in China by Heiner Fruehauf.

Ascending and Descending in Herbal Medicine: An Interview with Heiner Fruehauf, PhD

2017-04-01T18:53:32+00:00 Tags: , , , , , , , |

WITH HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


INTERVIEW BY BOB QUINN

Heiner Fruehauf sat down recently with his long-time student and colleague at National University of Natural Medicine, Bob Quinn, to discuss ascending and descending functions in the body. While on the surface a seemingly simple topic, it is in reality crucial to understand the up-down movement dynamic if one is to practice herbal medicine effectively.

Etymological Analysis of the Defining Quote on the Lung Official in Chapter Eight of the Huangdi neijing suwen (肺者,相傅之官,治節出焉)

2017-04-01T18:53:41+00:00 Tags: , , , , , , , |

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


A collection of classical texts are used etymologically to define the symbolic significance of the language in Huangdi neijing suwenChapter Eight, the defining quote about the lung organ network.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

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Voice from the Mountaintop: Heiner Fruehauf on Traditional Chinese Medicine and Lyme Disease (3 Parts)

2017-04-22T15:28:32+00:00 Tags: , , , , |

WITH HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


INTERVIEW BY REGINA WEICHART

Chinese medicine continues to be an extremely relevant clinical modality in modern times, in part because an increasing array of chronic disorders with autoimmune implications remain unrecognized, unexplained and unresolved by the parameters of western medicine. In this interview, Heiner Fruehauf explains the unique benefits and potential advantages of the Chinese medicine approach to patients and practitioners working with Lyme Disease, Fibromyalgia, and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Six Conformation Diagnosis in Context: The Six Cosmic Qi (liu qi) and the Six Stages of Qi Transformation (liu jing)

2017-04-01T18:56:08+00:00 Tags: , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


The six conformations represent another system of symbolic methodology that is of great importance for the practice of classical Chinese medicine. Its origins are related to both yin-yang and five phase element theory, yet it is often the primary diagnostic modality that certain practitioners, especially those trained in the lineage of Shanghan lun herbalism, choose to utilize.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

The Liver and Gall Bladder: Selected Readings

2017-04-01T18:56:19+00:00 Tags: , , , , , |

BY VARIOUS AUTHORS

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

The nature of wood is to spread. Once food qi enters the stomach, it relies entirely on the spreading and dredging function of liver wood, and it is only because of this influence that the food is transformed. If the liver's pure Yang does not rise, it cannot spread and dredge the grain and fluids, and distention and discomfort in the middle region will be the inevitable result. The liver is associated with wood.

[FROM TANG RONGCHAN, A TREATISE ON BLOOD DISORDERS (XUEZHENG LUN), 1884]

INDIVIDUAL MONOGRAPHS

Chinese Medicine In Crisis: Science, Politics, and the Making of “TCM”

2017-02-21T13:33:52+00:00 Tags: , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


This article is based on the conviction that the traditional art of Oriental medicine is dying—both in mainland China, home of the mother trunk of the field, and consequently overseas where branches of the tree are trying to grow. It may be an anachronistic piece, written at a time when TCM administrators around the world are celebrating major advances in the field, such as increasing numbers of students, practitioners, patients, colleges, universities, and hospitals, which all appear to reflect a booming state of Oriental medicine.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY SEPP LEEB

On the Relationship Between Medicine and Philosophy

2017-02-21T13:33:53+00:00 Tags: , , , , , , |

BY ZHANG XICHUN
(1860-1933)

TRANSLATED AND INTRODUCED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Zhang Xichun (1860-1933) is one of China's great scholar-physicians. He is primarily remembered for his prominent role in spearheading the early movement of Chinese-Western medicine integration during the first three decades of this century. The depth of his knowledge and the broad range of his activities, moreover, distinguish him as one of the last of the classical cast of renaissance physicians..

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Reflections on the Relationship of Traditional Wisdom, Precision, and Clinical Efficacy in the Herbal Science of Chinese Medicine (2 Parts)

2017-04-01T18:56:32+00:00 Tags: , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


This essay represents Heiner’s contribution to 2011’s Fuyang suntan (Discussion Forum on Supporting the Yang), China’s premier conference dedicated to upholding the roots of classical Chinese medicine. He notes the enormous transformative potential that natural medicine holds in the precarious times we live in, and underscores the importance of clinical efficacy in the process of promoting our medicine. In particular, he points out the importance of the “technological” details of the clinical encounter in Chinese medicine, which have been the basis for optimum clinical results in the past. In Part 2, he shares some aspects of his personal journey toward mastering the details of precise herb prescribing.

ENGLISH / GERMAN / CHINESE
GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

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Driving Out Demons and Snakes: Gu Syndrome, A Forgotten Clinical Approach to Chronic Parasitism

2017-04-22T15:20:14+00:00 Tags: , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


This presentation is an attempt to participate in the process of ‘medical archaeology’ by exploring one of the submerged areas of Oriental medicine, namely the complex and variegated clinical approach to the diagnosis and treatment of Gu syndrome (gu zheng). A review of the modern research literature shows that this topic has remained virtually unexplored in both China and the West. Although there are too many classical references to entirely ignore the phenomenon of Gu syndrome, mainland Chinese scholars generally dismiss it as an “ancient, feudalist and superstitious” belief in demons and exorcist practices that has little or no value in modern clinical practice.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Gancao Xiexin Tang (Licorice Purge the Heart Decoction): A Forgotten Key Remedy For the Treatment of Toxic Skin Conditions

2017-04-01T18:57:06+00:00 Tags: , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Gancao Xiexin Tang was first recorded by the Han physician Zhang Zhongjing about 1,800 years ago. Both Shanghan lun and Jingui yaolüe, the now separated parts of his classic guidebook on herbal formulas (Shanghan zabing lun), cite this particular formula. In modern times, this formula is usually regarded as a variation of the widely used Pinellia Purge the Heart Decoction (Banxia Xiexin Tang) and thus most often prescribed as a remedy for Banxia Xiexin Tang symptom complex (discomfort in stomach area, belching, diarrhea). This is precisely the usage suggested for this remedy in the Shanghai lan, where Gancao Xiexin Tang and Shengjiang Xiexin Tang are listed as variations of the standard Banxia Xiexin Tang.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

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Lyme Disease: An In-Depth Interview with Heiner Fruehauf

2017-04-22T17:33:07+00:00 Tags: , , , , , , |

WITH HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


INTERVIEW BY BOB QUINN,
WITH ERIN MORELAND

In the spring of 2011 Heiner Fruehauf, PhD, LAc sat down with his student and colleague, Bob Quinn, DAOM, LAc to discuss the finer points of “Brain Gu” syndrome, specifically as it pertains to the treatment of Lyme Disease. This discussion is best understood as a follow-up to and elaboration of the ideas presented in Heiner and Quinn’s earlier interview about Gu syndrome published in the fall of 2008 and available in the public part of this website.

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Gu Syndrome: An In-depth Interview with Heiner Fruehauf

2017-04-22T15:16:43+00:00 Tags: , , , , , , |

WITH HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


INTERVIEW BY BOB QUINN,
WITH ERIN MORELAND

In the autumn of 2008 Heiner Fruehauf, PhD, LAc, sat down with two of his students, Bob Quinn, DAOM, LAc and Erin Moreland, LAc, to discuss the finer points of Gu syndrome treatment. This discussion is best understood as a follow-up to and elaboration of the ideas presented in Heiner’s earlier article on Gu syndrome published in the 1998 May issue of The Journal of Chinese Medicine.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY SEPP LEEB

The Flagship Remedy of Chinese Medicine: Reflections on the Toxicity and Safety of Aconite

2017-02-21T14:44:53+00:00 Tags: , , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


In this paper, a seasoned practitioner of classical Chinese herbalism explains how one of the most important herbs in the Chinese materia medica can be used, once properly grown and processed, without the side effects associated with the toxic alkaloid aconitine. Heiner Fruehauf summarizes some of the dramatic lore surrounding the use of the herb aconite (Fuzi) in East and West, while exploring how Chinese medicine practitioners can utilize the herb safely in modern times to treat a wide range of medical conditions.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

A Description of the Therapeutic Uses of Aconite by the Ming Dynasty Scholar-Physician Zhang Jingyue (1583-1640)

2017-04-01T18:57:24+00:00 Tags: , , , , , , , , |

BY ZHANG JINGYUE
(1583-1640)

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

The flavor of Fuzi is pungent and sweet, and becomes extremely salty if immersed in brine. Its qi is very hot. This herb, therefore, carries within the energy of yang within yang. It is described as toxic. Its (toxic) effect is controlled by Renshen (ginseng), Huangqi (astragalus), Gancao (licorice), Heidou (black beans), Lüxijiao (green rhinozerus horn), Tongbian (human urine), Wujiu (Herba Stenolomae), and Fangfeng (siler).

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Zhang Zhicong (fl. 1619-1674): On Fuzi

2017-04-01T18:57:28+00:00 Tags: , , , , , , , , |

BY ZHANG ZHICONG
(1610-1674)

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

The flavor of Fuzi is pungent, its qi is warm, and it is extremely toxic. It treats wind cold pathogens that induce coughing and other counterflow issues, wind damp arthritis causing wandering pain and constriction, and knee pain with inability to walk. It breaks up tumors and masses, and heals blood accumulations as well as wounds caused by metal objects. The best Fuzi is produced in Mianzhou in the region of Shu.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Yang Tianhui: Notes from My Visit to the Fuzi Growing Area of Zhangming County

2017-04-01T18:57:33+00:00 Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY YANG TIANHUI
Song Dynasty (1039 CE)

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

The following text represents the most detailed pre-modern description of the traditional cultivation of medicinal aconite in China. It was written more than 900 years ago by a Sichuanese official in charge of Zhangming County. Zhangming is situated in the location of today’s Jiangyou County, epicenter of the recent Sichuan earthquake, which has been identified by all ancient materia medica experts as the only place where genuine Chinese aconite should be sourced from.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

The Importance of Aconite (fuzi) and Teachings From the Sichuan Fire Spirit School (an Interview with Heiner Fruehauf)

2017-04-01T18:57:44+00:00 Tags: , , , , , , , |

WITH HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


INTERVIEW BY BOB QUINN

On February 19, 2009 Heiner Fruehauf, PhD, LAc, sat down with his colleague Bob Quinn, DAOM, LAc, to discuss the importance of aconite (fuzi) in classical Chinese medicine. The discussion also covers aspects of the fuzi story not covered elsewhere in the west, namely its proper processing. Heiner also touches on some of the “nuts and bolts” of the Sichuan Fire Spirit School of herbal prescribing. As Heiner explains, fuzi used to be referred to as the “King of the 100 Herbs.” This information is crucial to understanding the scholarship and clinical power behind the Classical Pearls formulas that contain aconite.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Traditional Chinese Approaches to Gu Syndrome: Two 18th Century Examples

2017-04-22T15:13:52+00:00 Tags: , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Heiner Fruehauf has researched the ancient symbolism that defines the finer points of Chinese organ network function for 10 years. His prolific research project will eventually culminate in the creation of an illustrated compendium on the macrocosmic and microcosmic ramifications of organ network theory. Since the publication of this effort is still years away, he has decided to make a selection from his cache of existing research papers available now by publishing them on ClassicalChineseMedicine.org. The first installment of these papers consists of a detailed etymological analysis of the character of fei 肺 (lung), and the defining statement on the lung’s function/office in chapter 8 of the Huangdi neijing suwen.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

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Thunder Pearls – An Effective Chinese Herbal Treatment for Chronic Parasitism

2017-04-01T18:58:10+00:00 Tags: , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


This article is the first in a series of transcripts of video lectures from ClassicalPearls.org, the site for herbal formulas based on twenty years of clinical and academic research by Prof. Heiner Fruehauf. Thunder Pearls Chinese herbal formula is a unique remedy for the important clinical phenomenon of “Abdominal Gu Syndrome”: difficult and treatment resistant diseases caused by chronic, often undiagnosable parasitic infections of the digestive system. This formulation, as Dr. Fruehauf presents, is sourced from ancient Daoist medicine texts and personally proven many times in modern clinical practice. This statement has not been evaluated by the FDA.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

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Direct Transmission: Quest for the Heart in Classical Chinese Medicine

2017-03-25T15:58:00+00:00 Tags: , , , , |

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History, Department of Martial Arts and Nourishing Life
Total running time: 27 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, Translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

Direct Transmission shares the faces and stories of several remarkable practitioners of classical Chinese medicine, people who are a living link to the treasures of the past. It is our hope that the nature of this unprecedented material, woven of colorful and emotionally moving stories, interviews, and treatment sessions, will inspire expanded interest in, and understanding of, the profound value of traditional knowledge in general, and classical Chinese medicine in particular.

A Conversation On the Nature of Transmission

2017-04-01T18:58:35+00:00 Tags: , , , |

WANG QINGYU, LIU LIHONG, AND HEINER FRUEHAUF
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History, Department of Martial Arts and Nourishing Life / Institute for the Clinical Research of Classical Chinese Medicine, Guangxi University of TCM / National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine
Total running time: 20 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, interpreted and translated
into English by Heiner Fruehauf

In this video conversation at Jiashan Monastery in Hunan Province, China, two masters of the classical healing arts spontaneously share some of their insights into how information in classical Chinese medicine gets passed on in the magic of the moment.

Daoist Medicine: An Introduction

2017-04-01T18:58:38+00:00 Tags: , , , |

WANG QINGYU AND HEINER FRUEHAUF
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History, Department of Martial Arts and Nourishing Life / National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine
Total running time: 8 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf

Presentation about the root of Chinese medicine by one of China's only remaining elders of Daoist medicine.