Don’t Just Fixate on the Virus: Thoughts from Quarantine in Guilin

2021-03-23T15:13:16-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

BY LIU LIHONG
Institute for the Clinical Research of Classical Chinese Medicine, Guangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Pharmacology

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Here is yet another, this time more philosophical piece by the author of Classical Chinese Medicine, created in quarantine after leaving the COVID-19 ward in Wuhan. Dr. Liu suggests that it is time to lighten our investment in the “punitive measures” of modern medicine and shift toward a more unity oriented perspective on health and disease.

Etymological Analysis of the Defining Quote on the Lung Official in Chapter Eight of the Huangdi neijing suwen (肺者,相傅之官,治節出焉)

2021-03-19T17:55:07-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , |

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


A collection of classical texts are used etymologically to define the symbolic significance of the language in Huangdi neijing suwenChapter Eight, the defining quote about the lung organ network.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

The Principle of Supporting Yang

2017-04-01T18:56:03-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY LU CHONGHAN
Assistant Professor, Department of Fundamental Studies, Chengdu Universty of TCM; Lineage Holder of the “Fire Spirit” School of Sichuan herbalism

TRANSLATED BY KENDRA DALE

In this recently published transmission, the main successor of the Sichuan “Fire Spirit” school of aconite, ginger, and cinnamon usage issues a rare manifesto of the leading role of yang-qi in macrocosm and microcosm. In a challenge to the textbook parameters of TCM, Dr. Lu contents that support of this precious yang is one of the hallmarks of classical Chinese medicine, which must override most superficial symptoms of heat and yin deficiency.

LECTURE TRANSCRIPT

Fei: An Etymological Analysis of the Pictogram for ‘Lung’

2017-04-01T19:42:47-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


The word 肺, in a more specific reference to the specific function of this organ system, is classified by the component 巿 po (in its seal script form, composed of the pictographic components grass 屮and eight 八), meaning “abundant foliage in the wind” (this is a clear reference to the anatomical appearance of the lung lobes, as well as to traditional descriptions of this organ: Chinese texts describe them as “leaves”; see Shijing: 東門之楊, 其葉肺肺 “The poplars at the Eastern Gate, their leaves flutter lung-like in the wind;” Neijing: 肺熱葉焦 “When the lung is hot, its leaves become charred”); note that the rain forest with its prolific canopy of leaves is considered to be the lung of the earth.

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