Ascending and Descending in Herbal Medicine: An Interview with Heiner Fruehauf, PhD

2021-03-19T17:50:56-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , |

WITH HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


INTERVIEW BY BOB QUINN

Heiner Fruehauf sat down recently with his long-time student and colleague at National University of Natural Medicine, Bob Quinn, to discuss ascending and descending functions in the body. While on the surface a seemingly simple topic, it is in reality crucial to understand the up-down movement dynamic if one is to practice herbal medicine effectively.

The Flagship Remedy of Chinese Medicine: Reflections on the Toxicity and Safety of Aconite

2021-03-22T15:06:34-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

In this paper, a seasoned practitioner of classical Chinese herbalism explains how one of the most important herbs in the Chinese materia medica can be used, once properly grown and processed, without the side effects associated with the toxic alkaloid aconitine. Heiner Fruehauf summarizes some of the dramatic lore surrounding the use of the herb aconite (Fuzi) in East and West, while exploring how Chinese medicine practitioners can utilize the herb safely in modern times to treat a wide range of medical conditions.

A Description of the Therapeutic Uses of Aconite by the Ming Dynasty Scholar-Physician Zhang Jingyue (1583-1640)

2021-03-22T14:48:51-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , |

BY ZHANG JINGYUE
(1583-1640)

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

The flavor of Fuzi is pungent and sweet, and becomes extremely salty if immersed in brine. Its qi is very hot. This herb, therefore, carries within the energy of yang within yang. It is described as toxic. Its (toxic) effect is controlled by Renshen (ginseng), Huangqi (astragalus), Gancao (licorice), Heidou (black beans), Lüxijiao (green rhinozerus horn), Tongbian (human urine), Wujiu (Herba Stenolomae), and Fangfeng (siler).

Principles and Persuasions in Chinese Medicine Diagnosis – Selected Readings

2017-04-01T19:51:14-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY VARIOUS AUTHORS

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Prior to the process of treating disease, the sage (superior doctor) must be able to distinguish the Yin and Yang of Heaven and Earth. S/he must know the rhythmic flow of the four seasons and the intricate relationships between the five organ networks and the six bowel systems. S/he must be able to distinguish the Yin/Yang and exterior/interior quality of the meridians, and know what kind of diseases to treat with acupuncture, what kind with moxibustion, and what kind with herbs.

INDIVIDUAL MONOPGRAPHS

Alcohol Use in Traditional Chinese Formulas

2017-04-01T20:00:20-07:00Tags: , , , |

BY VARIOUS AUTHORS
Translated by Heiner Fruehauf

Prior to the process of treating disease, the sage (superior doctor) must be able to distinguish the Yin and Yang of Heaven and Earth. S/he must know the rhythmic flow of the four seasons and the intricate relationships between the five organ networks and the six bowel systems. S/he must be able to distinguish the Yin/Yang and exterior/interior quality of the meridians, and know what kind of diseases to treat with acupuncture, what kind with moxibustion, and what kind with herbs. S/he must understand the relationship between health and social interaction, master the standard procedure of diagnosis and treatment, and discern the constitutional differences in rich and poor people.

FROM INNER CANON OF THE YELLOW EMPEROR (NEIJING SUWEN, CHAPTER 77: "ANALYZING THE FIVE MISTAKES IN DIAGNOSIS" (FL. 200 B.C.

Bagang: The Eight Diagnostic Parameters

2017-04-01T20:01:48-07:00Tags: , , , |

BY VARIOUS AUTHORS

INTRODUCED AND TRANSLATED
BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Traditional Chinese medicine incorporates several diagnostic systems of differentiation, such as the five organ approach, the six confirmation approach, and the triple warmer approach. These different diagnostic systems are frequently combined in clinical practice, but since they were conceived and favored by different schools of medical practitioners, they are often used completely independent from each other. The eight diagnostic parameters, also called the eight principal patterns in diagnosis or the eight rubrics, constitute the most fundamental set of diagnostic standards which all practitioners of Chinese medicine—independent of their preference for one system of diagnosis or another—use and must know.