Building the Heart Bridge: The Importance of Direct Connection in the Transmission of Traditional Knowledge (4 Parts)

2021-06-11T16:01:43-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts & Nourishing Life


In this presentation, respected Daoist medicine elder Wang Qingyu dialogues with his student, Heiner Fruehauf, about the importance of maintaining consistency in Qigong practice, and the vital importance of the concept of lineage in Chinese medicine and related forms of personal cultivation.

Total running time: 1 hr. 5 mins.
English and Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf

Jinjing Qigong: Deeper Meaning of the Phase Element “Wood” and the Foundational Principles of Jinjing Qigong (3 Parts)

2021-06-11T16:02:16-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts & Nourishing Life


In this presentation Dr. Heiner Fruehauf explores advanced layers of the Wood element in Chinese medicine by introducing the meaning of Jinjing Gong 筋經功 (Tendon and Meridian Opening Qigong), the Daoist lineage he received from nourishing life expert Wang Qingyu and later incorporated into the curriculum of the College of Classical Chinese Medicine at National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon.

Total running time: 2 hrs. 58 mins.
English and Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

The Inspiring Life Story of Chinese Qigong Master Wang Qingyu (2 Parts)

2021-04-14T16:07:05-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

In this two-part podcast, Laurie narrates and Heiner translates the biographical story of master Wang Qingyu. The story begins with Master Wang’s birth, literally on a battlefield during the Japanese invasion of China. Especially touching are his remembrances of his beloved Daoist teacher, Li Jie, a legendary Daoist hermit who taught young Wang the real value of cultivation practices–to know one’s own heart and become a truly good person.

Practical Guidelines for the Therapeutic Benefits of Daoist Qigong

2021-06-14T19:24:15-07:00Tags: , , , |

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History, Department of Martial Arts and Nourishing Life
Total running time: 12 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

In this presentation, one of the few remaining masters of authentic Daoist practices in the tradition of the Yijin jing (Tendon and Sinew Changing Classic) is sharing valuable insights into the ancient medical art of Qigong.

Insights on the Power of Jinjing Qigong

2021-06-14T19:42:07-07:00Tags: , |

LIU LIHONG
Institute for the Clinical Research of Classical Chinese Medicine, Guangxi University of TCM
Total running time: 14 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

In this passionate presentation captured at Jiashan Monastery in Hunan, China's premier advocate of the classical wisdom traditions in Chinese medicine illuminates the crucial difference between ancient and modern methods of acquiring knowledge.

Qigong: On the Rewards of Continuous Practice and the Importance of Lineage

2021-06-14T19:54:37-07:00Tags: , , , |

WANG QINGYU AND HEINER FRUEHAUF
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History, Department of Martial Arts and Nourishing Life / National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine
Total running time: 8 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

In this presentation, respected Daoist medicine elder Wang Qingyu dialogues with his student, Heiner Fruehauf, about the importance of maintaining consistency in Qigong practice, and the vital importance of the concept of lineage in Chinese medicine and related forms of personal cultivation.

The Five Elemental Sounds and the Power of Internal Alchemy

2021-06-11T16:04:06-07:00Tags: , , , , |

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts & Nourishing Life


Wang Qingyu, professor at the Sichuan Academy of Cultural Science and lineage holder of the Jinjing style of Qigong, speaks on the vibrational aspects of Chinese medicine by introducing the five pentatonic sounds of Chinese music in a medical context. From a cultivational perspective, he talks about how to work with the five sounds within the body during Qigong meditation.

Total running time: 60 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf

Jinjing Shisi Shi—The 14 Movements of the Jinjing School of Qigong

2021-06-11T16:06:08-07:00Tags: , , , , |

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts & Nourishing Life


HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


In this presentation, with assistance from Heiner Fruehauf, Wang Qingyu, professor at the Sichuan Academy of Cultural Science and lineage holder of the Jinjing style of Qigong, demonstrates the Jinjing Shisi Shi—The 14 Movements of the Jinjing School of Qigong.

Total running time: 56 mins.
English

Cultivating the Flow: A Concept Of Evolutive Well-Being that Integrates the Classic Traditions and Quantum Science

2021-04-20T11:37:04-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Approaching the end of the 20th century, we are confronted with a number of fundamental issues regarding the quality, if not the general purpose, of human existence. One of them is the gradual demise of the Western-scientific health care system, which has fostered a revival of the age-old discussion about the nature of health, illness, and well-being. In the process of developing alternative approaches to healing, holistic medical discourse has consistently emphasized the “diseased” quality of illness and its therapeutic implications, i.e. the consequent restoration and maintenance of “ease.” However, definitions of the ease state often fail to go much beyond the biochemical aspects of well-being, and thus end up being classified according to the same parameters they were trying to overcome.

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