Building the Heart Bridge: The Importance of Direct Connection in the Transmission of Traditional Knowledge (4 Parts)

2020-09-17T10:38:18-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts & Nourishing Life


Total running time: 1 hr. 5 mins.
English and Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

In this presentation, respected Daoist medicine elder Wang Qingyu dialogues with his student, Heiner Fruehauf, about the importance of maintaining consistency in Qigong practice, and the vital importance of the concept of lineage in Chinese medicine and related forms of personal cultivation.

Jinjing Qigong: Deeper Meaning of the Phase Element “Wood” and the Foundational Principles of Jinjing Qigong (3 Parts)

2020-09-17T10:38:05-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts & Nourishing Life


Total running time: 2 hrs. 58 mins.
English and Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

In this presentation Dr. Heiner Fruehauf explores advanced layers of the Wood element in Chinese medicine by introducing the meaning of Jinjing Gong 筋經功 (Tendon and Meridian Opening Qigong), the Daoist lineage he received from nourishing life expert Wang Qingyu and later incorporated into the curriculum of the College of Classical Chinese Medicine at National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon.

Medicine and the Dao: New Reflections on the Relationship Between Two Vital Aspects of Chinese Culture (3 Parts)

2020-09-17T10:41:13-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts & Nourishing Life


HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine

Total running time: 3 hrs. 5 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

After a similar lecture series Daoist Medicine: the Alchemical and Shamanic Root of Chinese Medicine that we offered 10 years ago, Prof. Wang Qingyu, China's premier expert of Daoist medicine and the ancient science of nourishing life is back with us at the ripe age of 80 to give us another round of reflections on his favorite topic.

The Essence of Chinese Medicine

2020-04-14T12:25:13-07:00Tags: , , , , , , |

WU SHENG'AN
Xi'an Master Folk Physician
Total running time: 17 mins.
Mandarin Chinese
with English subtitles

ClassicalChineseMedicine.org is proud to announce that one of Northern China’s most pre-eminent folk physicians has become a permanent advisor to our online family. Dr. Wu Sheng’an is a classically trained master physician who still combines many traditional skills that are virtually impossible to find in one person in modern-day China: chrono-acupuncturist, wildcrafter and processor of medicinal plants, internal medicine expert specializing in difficult and recalcitrant diseases, Taiji master, and active proponent of Sun Simiao’s medical ethics.

What Is a Classic: On the Importance of Transmission, Inner Cultivation and Sage Consciousness

2017-09-02T15:40:16-07:00Tags: , , , |

LIU LIHONG
Institute for the Research and Preservation of Classical Chinese Medicine, Guangxi University of TCM

Total running time: 56 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

In this lecture given on the top of Mt. Baishi, meditation site of the great 4th century alchemist Ge Hong, China’s main proponent of classical Chinese medicine gives an articulate and highly personal transmission about the reasons why a Chinese medicine practitioner should study the medical classics and use them as an important cultivational tool.

The Qualities of a Good Physician

2017-04-01T19:16:16-07:00Tags: , , , , |

BY ANONYMOUS
(12 Century)

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Everyone who walks the path of healing has to first understand the fundamental principles that are behind all technical aspects of medicine. Only then should herbs and other modalities be prescribed. If healing is approached from the underlying source, all treatment efforts will be sublime and clinical results will naturally follow.

How a Great Physician Should Train for the Practice of Medicine

2017-04-01T19:33:02-07:00Tags: , , |

BY SUN SIMIAO
(581-682)

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Everyone who aspires to be a great physician must be intimately familiar with the following classics: the Simple Questions (Huangdi neijing suwen), the Systematic Classic of Acupuncture and Moxibustion (Zhenjiu jiayi jing), the Yellow Emperor’s Needle Classic (Huangdi neijing lingshu), and the Laws of Energy Circulation from the Hall of Enlightenment (Mingtang liuzhu). Furthermore, one must master the twelve channel systems, the three locations and nine positions of pulse diagnosis, the system of the five zang and the six fu organs, the concept of surface and interior, the acumoxa points, as well as the materia medica in the form of single herbs, herb pairs, and the classic formulas presented in the writings of Zhang Zhongjing (fl.150-219, author of the Shanghan zabing lun)...

Promoting Health and Relaxation During the Four Seasons

2017-04-01T19:34:07-07:00Tags: , , , |

BY GAO LIAN
(16th Century)

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

The following is a presentation of four famous seasonal tableaux by Gao Lian, a 16th century poet and medical scholar who was an ardent proponent of the art of nourishing life. They originally appeared in Gao's book, Zunsheng bajian (Eight Pieces on Observing the Fundamental Principles of Life), which Chinese physicians used to regard as a comprehensive source of lifestyle related information. Recommencing one of the main themes of the Neijing, these seasonal portraits can be read as a typical attempt to translate the densely crafted teachings of the classic into more contemporary language.

The Meaning of Health: Harmony and Balance in Classical Chinese Medicine (3 Parts)

2017-04-21T16:09:24-07:00Tags: , , , |

LIU LIHONG
Institute for the Clinical Research of Classical Chinese Medicine, Guangxi University of TCM

Total running time: 163 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

In these lectures, Prof. Liu systematically traces the root concepts of Chinese medicine, and makes bold suggestions how its classical spirit needs to be interpreted dynamically to meet the clinical needs of our time. A brilliant plaidoyer to all natural health professionals for recognizing and healing the emotional causes of disease.

The Dialectics of the Heart—10 Practical Steps to Live in Health and Integrity

2017-09-02T14:34:05-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

ABBOT MINGCHAN
Jiashan Zen Monastery, Hunan

Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf
Total running time: 62 mins.


This presentation offers practical transmissions on how to cultivate oneself in the midst of everyday life. These transmissions hail from classical Chinese texts, and are interpreted by a modern Zen master.

The Dao of Healing (2 Parts)

2017-04-13T12:23:12-07:00Tags: , , , |

ABBOT FU YUANFA
Yuntai Guan Monastery, Sichuan, China

Total running time: 127 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

Daoist medicine is the mysterious precursor of Chinese medicine, a vast yet barely researched field of traditional medical science. Abbot Fu Yuanfa of the Yuntai Guan monastery in Sichuan gives a lively account of his medical and spiritual studies with his master, the legendary master healer Li Zhenguo. He outlines the importance of personal cultivation and intention in healing, as well as several profound yet simple principles for treating with herbs.

On Cultivation and the Spirit of Chinese Medicine

2017-04-13T11:01:55-07:00Tags: , , , , |

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts & Nourishing Life


Total running time: 1 hr. 17 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English
by Heiner Fruehauf

In this lively presentation, China’s premier expert of Daoist medicine and the ancient science of nourishing life gives a highly personal account of the role of personal cultivation and the acquisition of practitioner knowledge in the traditional teacher–disciple relationship.

Jinjing Shisi Shi—The 14 Movements of the Jinjing School of Qigong

2017-04-13T10:46:51-07:00Tags: , , , , |

WANG QINGYU
Sichuan Academy of Cultural History,
Department of Martial Arts & Nourishing Life


HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Total running time: 56 mins.
English

In this presentation, with assistance from Heiner Fruehauf, Wang Qingyu, professor at the Sichuan Academy of Cultural Science and lineage holder of the Jinjing style of Qigong, demonstrates the Jinjing Shisi Shi—The 14 Movements of the Jinjing School of Qigong.