Spirit of the Points: Lung Channel (4 Parts)

2021-07-20T12:27:18-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The great Tang dynasty scholar physician Sun Simiao hinted 1,400 years ago that the secret of understanding the power of the acupuncture points is encoded in their ancient names—a vital piece of information with enormous clinical implications, which has literally been lost in translation. Most Western practitioners of Chinese medicine associate each acupuncture point with an abstract number. This series represents the detailed delivery of goods that was announced last year with the existing video lecture on symbolism of acu-points.

Etymological Analysis of the Defining Quote on the Lung Official in Chapter Eight of the Huangdi neijing suwen (肺者,相傅之官,治節出焉)

2021-03-19T17:55:07-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , |

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


A collection of classical texts are used etymologically to define the symbolic significance of the language in Huangdi neijing suwenChapter Eight, the defining quote about the lung organ network.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

The Organ Networks of Chinese Medicine: Lung (3 Parts)

2021-06-09T18:31:36-07:00Tags: , , , , |

HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine
College of Classical Chinese Medicine

Total running time: 3 parts, approx. 1 hr each

These presentations comprise a unique series about the physiology of the Chinese medicine organ networks. Based on a 10-year research project led by sinologist and Chinese medicine practitioner Heiner Fruehauf, these lectures explore a field of ancient symbolism that greatly illuminates the physical, emotional, and spiritual functions of the organ systems. Based on the introductory lecture, Macrocosmic Alchemy: The Hidden Code to Deciphering the Function of the Chinese Organ Networks.

The Lung and the Tiger Image: An Example of Decoding the Symbolic Record of Chinese Medicine

2017-04-01T19:26:22-07:00Tags: , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Heiner Fruehauf has researched the ancient symbolism that defines the finer points of Chinese organ network function for 10 years. His prolific research project will eventually culminate in the creation of an illustrated compendium on the macrocosmic and microcosmic ramifications of organ network theory. Since the publication of this effort is still years away, he has decided to make a selection from his cache of existing research papers available now by publishing them on ClassicalChineseMedicine.org. The first installment of these papers consists of a detailed etymological analysis of the character of fei 肺 (lung), and the defining statement on the lung’s function/office in chapter 8 of the Huangdi neijing suwen.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

Fei: An Etymological Analysis of the Pictogram for ‘Lung’

2017-04-01T19:42:47-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


The word 肺, in a more specific reference to the specific function of this organ system, is classified by the component 巿 po (in its seal script form, composed of the pictographic components grass 屮and eight 八), meaning “abundant foliage in the wind” (this is a clear reference to the anatomical appearance of the lung lobes, as well as to traditional descriptions of this organ: Chinese texts describe them as “leaves”; see Shijing: 東門之楊, 其葉肺肺 “The poplars at the Eastern Gate, their leaves flutter lung-like in the wind;” Neijing: 肺熱葉焦 “When the lung is hot, its leaves become charred”); note that the rain forest with its prolific canopy of leaves is considered to be the lung of the earth.

Correlative Cosmology: Energetics of the First Month of Spring and Lung Function

2017-02-19T13:36:59-08:00Tags: , , , , |

COLLATED AND TRANSLATED
BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


In this article of Chinese to English translations, Heiner Fruehauf explores the lung as a metal organ according to the five phase element system. Modern Chinese medicine discourse, therefore, has exclusively focused on this organ’s association with the metal season of fall. In original Neijing cosmology, however, the five phase system is paralleled by a more complex and inclusive system of twelve functional entities that correlate the twelve months of the year with the order of the twelve channel systems that we now refer to as the “organ clock.”

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