Why Classical Chinese Medicine is Relevant Today

2021-04-14T16:04:46-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , |

Co-host Laurie Regan interviews Heiner Fruehauf to learn about the basic principles of classical Chinese medicine, and why this ancient knowledge still holds so much relevance for us today. Many ancient cultures had the practical realization that everything that exists is an inseparable mix of energy and matter, and is interconnected with everything else. Nothing is coincidence. In the realm of medicine, this means that every illness has meaning, and every symptom is a physical marker for the energy and consciousness that forms it. We can learn to read and interpret symptoms to understand the root cause of illness and find true solutions for restoring health.

All Disease Comes From the Heart: The Pivotal Role of the Emotions in Classical Chinese Medicine

2021-10-19T16:38:29-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Most modern clinicians find that a majority of their patients suffer from the symptom complex generally referred to as “stress.” Emotional stress, however, is usually regarded as a confounding rather than a causative factor in pathophysiology. This assessment is contrary to the tenets of classical Chinese medicine, which originally regarded emotional imbalance as a spiritual affliction of primary significance. While ancient Chinese philosophy considered emotional sensibility as our greatest asset in the process of fulfilling human destiny, it also regarded human temperaments as our greatest liability due to vast pathogenetic potential.

A Die Aufzeichung vom Luofluss

2017-04-01T19:27:43-07:00Tags: , , , , , , |

BY LIU YIMING
(18th century)

For our German speaking audience, Liu is the most influential Daoist writer and commentator in the last 500 years. He is known for translating some of the esoteric and highly symbolic concepts of Daoism into clear language. His commentary on the River Map is a vital piece for the understanding of yin/yang and Five Phase Element theory.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY BENJAMIN WITT

Liu Yiming: Die Flusskarte

2017-04-01T19:31:50-07:00Tags: , , , , , , |

BY LIU YIMING
(18th century)

Liu is the most influential Daoist writer and commentator in the last 500 years. He is known for translating some of the esoteric and highly symbolic concepts of Daoism into clear language. His commentary on the River Map is a vital piece for the understanding of yin/yang and Five Phase Element theory.

GERMAN TRANSLATION BY BENJAMIN WITT

Five Phase Element Relationships

2017-04-01T19:34:11-07:00Tags: , , |

BY WAN MINYING
(14th Century)

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Metal is generated by Earth; if there is too much earth, Metal will be buried. Earth is generated by Fire; if there is too much Fire, Earth will be charred. Fire is generated by Wood; if there is too much Wood, Fire will flare. Wood is generated by Water; if there is too much Water, Wood will be washed away. Water is generated by Metal; if there is too much Metal, Water will be grimy.

Correlative Cosmology: Energetics of the First Month of Spring and Lung Function

2017-02-19T13:36:59-08:00Tags: , , , , |

COLLATED AND TRANSLATED
BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


In this article of Chinese to English translations, Heiner Fruehauf explores the lung as a metal organ according to the five phase element system. Modern Chinese medicine discourse, therefore, has exclusively focused on this organ’s association with the metal season of fall. In original Neijing cosmology, however, the five phase system is paralleled by a more complex and inclusive system of twelve functional entities that correlate the twelve months of the year with the order of the twelve channel systems that we now refer to as the “organ clock.”

Correlative Cosmology: Energetics of the Second Month of Spring and Large Intestine Function

2017-04-01T19:49:40-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , |

COLLATED AND TRANSLATED
BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

National University of Natural Medicine
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


According to the five phase element system, the large intestine is classified as a metal organ. Modern Chinese medicine discourse, therefore, has exclusively focused on this organ’s association with the metal season of fall. In original Neijing cosmology, however, the five phase system is paralleled by a more complex and inclusive system of twelve functional entities that correlate the twelve months of the year with the order of the twelve channel systems that we now refer to as the “organ clock.”

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