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Articles about symbolism in Chinese medicine.

Six Conformation Diagnosis in Context: The Six Cosmic Qi (liu qi) and the Six Stages of Qi Transformation (liu jing)

2022-09-07T12:47:22-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
GERMAN TRANSLATION BY MARKUS GOEKE

The six conformations represent another system of symbolic methodology that is of great importance for the practice of classical Chinese medicine. Its origins are related to both yin-yang and five phase element theory, yet it is often the primary diagnostic modality that certain practitioners, especially those trained in the lineage of Shanghan lun herbalism, choose to utilize.

An Excerpt from Qianjin yifang (Supplemental Prescriptions Worth a Thousand in Gold) on the Importance of the Acupuncture Point Names

2022-09-07T12:48:14-07:00Tags: , , , , |

BY SUN SIMIAO (581-682)
TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

None of the acupuncture names were chosen randomly, all of them contain deep meaning. All point names containing the character for the wood element 木 are related to the Liver. All point names associated with Spirit (shen) 神 are related to the Heart. All point names associated with metal 金 or jade 玉 are related to the Lung. All point names associated with water 水 are related to the Kidney. Similarly, the Spirit’s state of movement is also potentially reflected in the point names. All points with the character Fu 府 (Storage) in their name affect the gathering of Spirit.

Cosmological Thought in China and Europe: Introduction, Yin & Yang

2022-09-07T12:49:57-07:00Tags: , , , , |

BY FRANK FIEDELER
TRANSLATED BY GABRIEL WEISS

This original translation is the introduction and first chapter from the volume Yin und Yang (Yin and Yang), by the late Prof. Frank Fiedeler, one of the best modern interpreters of the Yijing, and is one of the few scholars who have made the symbolic methodology of Han and pre-Han dynasty thought accessible for the field of Chinese medicine.

Chinese Medicine Holomap with the 28 Stellar Constellations

2022-09-19T20:26:40-07:00Tags: , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

MAP DESCRIBING THE RESONANCE OF MACROCOSM AND MICROCOSM

For over 25 years, Heiner Fruehauf has led a research project decoding the ancient Chinese science linking macrocosm and microcosm, which so crucially informed the original definition of the 12 organ networks of classical Chinese medicine. Per popular request, he has synthesized this information into a "holomap", which reflects the functional resonance of each organ systems with the 28 stellar constellations, the 12 earthly branches, the 12 tidal hexagrams, the 12 times of the day, the 12 months of the year, and the 12 rivers mentioned in Lingshu chapter 12.

The Classical Pearls Series of Remedies: Positions on the Alchemical Holomap of the Chinese Organ Networks

2022-09-07T12:51:46-07:00Tags: , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

We are excited to present an informative learning tool and clinical resource — a chart that aligns the remedies in the Classical Pearls Herbal Formulas™ family around the cosmological holomap of the Chinese organ networks that Heiner Fruehauf so often teaches about and has spent over 25 years researching. This chart is primarily to show, at one glance, where the constitutional home of each of each remedy is. The chart includes a short description of how the remedy functions with regard to Chinese medical physiology.

Fei: An Etymological Analysis of the Pictogram for ‘Lung’

2022-09-07T12:52:51-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

The word 肺, in a more specific reference to the specific function of this organ system, is classified by the component 巿 po (in its seal script form, composed of the pictographic components grass 屮and eight 八), meaning “abundant foliage in the wind” (this is a clear reference to the anatomical appearance of the lung lobes, as well as to traditional descriptions of this organ: Chinese texts describe them as “leaves”; see Shijing: 東門之楊, 其葉肺肺 “The poplars at the Eastern Gate, their leaves flutter lung-like in the wind;” Neijing: 肺熱葉焦 “When the lung is hot, its leaves become charred”); note that the rain forest with its prolific canopy of leaves is considered to be the lung of the earth.

Die Wurzeln der chinesischen Medizin, Teil I

2022-09-07T13:13:09-07:00Tags: , , |

VON HEINER FRÜHAUF
AUS DEM ENGLISCHEN ÜBERSETZT
VON SEPP LEEB

Dieser Artikel fasst die ersten Ergebnisse eines laufenden Forschungsprojekts zusammen, das von der Akupunkturpunkt-Forschungsgruppe des College of Classical Chinese Medicine an der National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon, durchgeführt wurde. Erstveröffentlichung im Journal of Chinese Medicine (Februar 2002).

Die Wurzeln der chinesischen Medizin, Teil II

2022-09-07T13:13:37-07:00Tags: , , |

VON HEINER FRÜHAUF
AUS DEM ENGLISCHEN ÜBERSETZT
VON SEPP LEEB

Dieser Artikel fasst die ersten Ergebnisse eines laufenden Forschungsprojekts zusammen, das von der Akupunkturpunkt-Forschungsgruppe des College of Classical Chinese Medicine an der National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon, durchgeführt wurde. Erstveröffentlichung im Journal of Chinese Medicine (Juni 2002).

Correlative Cosmology: Energetics of the First Month of Spring and Lung Function

2022-09-07T13:11:49-07:00Tags: , , , , |

COLLATED AND TRANSLATED
BY HEINER FRUEHAUF


In this article of Chinese to English translations, Heiner Fruehauf explores the lung as a metal organ according to the five phase element system. Modern Chinese medicine discourse, therefore, has exclusively focused on this organ’s association with the metal season of fall. In original Neijing cosmology, however, the five phase system is paralleled by a more complex and inclusive system of twelve functional entities that correlate the twelve months of the year with the order of the twelve channel systems that we now refer to as the “organ clock.”

Correlative Cosmology: Energetics of the Second Month of Spring and Large Intestine Function

2022-09-07T13:09:47-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , |

COLLATED AND TRANSLATED
BY HEINER FRUEHAUF


According to the five phase element system, the large intestine is classified as a metal organ. Modern Chinese medicine discourse, therefore, has exclusively focused on this organ’s association with the metal season of fall. In original Neijing cosmology, however, the five phase system is paralleled by a more complex and inclusive system of twelve functional entities that correlate the twelve months of the year with the order of the twelve channel systems that we now refer to as the “organ clock.”

Philosophical and Cosmological Texts From the Formative Period of Chinese Medicine (The Han and Pre-Han Periods of Chinese Antiquity)

2022-09-07T13:11:34-07:00Tags: , , , , , , |

COMPILED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Chinese medicine is a microcosmic branch of ancient Chinese philosophy and cosmology. The better one understands the philosophical foundations of Chinese medicine, the deeper one’s knowledge of its core concepts and terminology can be. Theories such as yin and yang, the five phase elements, the hierarchical relationship between matter, energy, and consciousness, the supremacy of spirit, and the twelve organ networks were first mentioned in the Daoist and Confucian classics of the Han and Pre-Han periods of Chinese antiquity (fl. 700 BC - 200 AD) before they appeared in the keystone works of Chinese medicine. The following represents a comprehensive list of relevant philosophical, scientific, and literary works from the formative period of Chinese medicine in English translation.

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