The Importance of Classical Chinese Medicine in Modern Times

2020-04-02T11:58:38-07:00Tags: , , , |

HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine
Total running time: 11 mins.

In this keynote speech at a recent Chinese medicine conference in Poland, Heiner Fruehauf spoke about the ancient core concepts of this dynamic medicine, and how utilizing the medicine in its intended classical forms (as a fully realized, potent system of medicine) is of great importance at a time when Western medicine and modern TCM are encountering limitations in treating the complex diseases of our time.

Restoring the Vital Link Between Gut Chemistry and Brain Chemistry: Using Chinese Herbs to Treat Food Allergies, Leaky Gut Syndrome, IBS, SIBO and GAPS (2 Parts)

2021-06-11T15:48:52-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


In this 2-part series, Heiner Fruehauf explains how to restore gut terrain with Chinese herbs and re-establish the important connection between the body's digestive system and the nervous system and brain. Particularly, he focuses on digestive impairments such as food allergies, leaky gut, irritable bowel syndrome, small intestine bacterial overgrowth, and gut and physiology syndrome.

Total running time: 96 mins.
English

Fuxing Jue and Tangye Jing Translation Project: Preface

2021-07-20T13:19:55-07:00Tags: , , , , |

TRANSLATED BY MICHAEL DELL'ORFANO

EDITED AND CRITICALLY ANNOTATED
BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

The Hermit says: Every student of the Dao and all seekers of longevity must first learn how to expel disease. Practitioners often suffer from chronic health problems or acute manifestations of seasonal illnesses. In this case, one needs to first employ the systematic methods of tonifying or reducing the five zang organs by imbibing several doses of herbal medicine.

Introducing the Fuxing jue (Extraneous Secrets) and Tangye jing (Decoction Classic) Translation Project

2020-09-17T14:50:57-07:00Tags: , , , , |

BY HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Chinese herbal formulas are typically distinguished as jingfang (classical remedies) or shifang (contemporary remedies). During the last millennium, the origin of all classical formulas has generally been attributed to the Shanghan zabing lan (Treatise on Cold Damage Disorders and Miscellaneous Diseases), Chinese medicine’s seminal work on the systematic categorization of disease patterns and corresponding formulas by the Han dynasty scholar-physician Zhang Zhongjing (150-219 ACE). Historical sources reveal, however, that at least eleven classical herb primers (jingfang) existed before Zhang’s birth.

Formula Family Series: Xiexin Tang, Sini San, and Baihe Tang Formulas (3 Parts)

2021-06-09T19:13:53-07:00Tags: , , , , , , |

ZENG RONGXIU
Five Branches University; National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine

An 84-year old master of the Tian Heming Shanghan lineage of Sichuan herbalism shares practical case examples that illuminate important aspects of Shanghan lun formula application.

Total running time: 167 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf

Single Herbs: Sanqi (Panax notoginseng)

2021-03-19T19:21:43-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

By Heiner Fruehauf Heiner Fruehauf's prolific research trip to China and Vietnam in the summer of 2014 to source high quality, potent, directly-traded Chinese herbs from small family farms provided a significant amount of material and information about didao yocai and paozhi - terroir [...]

Single Herbs: Baishao (Paeonia lactiflora)

2021-03-22T13:29:36-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

By Heiner Fruehauf Heiner Fruehauf's prolific research trip to China and Vietnam in the summer of 2014 to source high quality, potent, directly-traded Chinese herbs from small family farms provided a significant amount of material and information about didao yocai and paozhi - terroir [...]

Single Herbs: Shanyao (Dioscorea opposita)

2021-03-22T13:30:02-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

By Heiner Fruehauf Heiner Fruehauf's prolific research trip to China and Vietnam in the summer of 2014 to source high quality, potent, directly-traded Chinese herbs from small family farms provided a significant amount of material and information about didao yocai and paozhi - terroir [...]

Guizhi (Cinnamon) – From Bencao qiuzhen (Exploring the True Meaning of the Materia Medica, 1769)

2017-04-01T19:15:17-07:00Tags: , , , , |

BY HUANG GONGXIU
(18th Century)

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Cinnamon twig primarily enters the muscle layer at the surface of the body. At the same time, it enters the heart and liver channels. It is the branch of the cassia tree which also yields cinnamon bark. Cinnamon twig is light, its nourishing essence is pungent, and its color is red (therefore its affinity to the heart). The action of cinnamon twig is rising without descending.

FROM BENCAO QIUZHEN (EXPLORING THE TRUE MEANING OF THE MATERIA MEDICA, 1769)

Single Herbs: Shichangpu (Acorus gramineus)

2021-03-22T13:30:59-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

By Heiner Fruehauf Heiner Fruehauf's prolific research trip to China and Vietnam in the summer of 2014 to source high quality, potent, directly-traded Chinese herbs from small family farms provided a significant amount of material and information about didao yocai and paozhi - terroir [...]

Single Herbs: Banxia (Pinellia ternata)

2021-03-22T13:32:00-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

By Heiner Fruehauf Heiner Fruehauf's prolific research trip to China and Vietnam in the summer of 2014 to source high quality, potent, directly-traded Chinese herbs from small family farms provided a significant amount of material and information about didao yocai and paozhi - terroir [...]

Wuzhuyu – Evodia (Translation)

2017-04-01T19:19:33-07:00Tags: , , , , |

BY HUANG GONGXIU
(18th Century)

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Wuzhuyu (Evodia ruticarpa) eliminates counterflow of cold liver qi. Its flavor is bitter, and its quality is hot and dry. It is slightly toxic. It has a primary affinity to the qi layer of the jueyin networks. It counteracts bloating. Li Dongyuan once said: “For a situation where turbid yin toxins do not descend and cause severe counterflow symptoms above, in severe cases accompanied by bloating and swelling, Wuzhuyu is the only substance that can effectively treat this condition.” Overuse of this herb, however, will cause harm to a person’s source qi.

FROM BENCAO QIUZHEN (EXPLORING THE TRUE MEANING OF THE MATERIA MEDICA, 1769)

A Practical Introduction to Dr. Wu Sheng’an’s Method of Ascending/Descending Chinese Herbal Prescriptions

2021-06-11T15:49:28-07:00Tags: , , , |

WU ZHAOQING
Xi'an Master Folk Physician

WU ZHAOQING
Eldest son of Dr. Wu

Dr. Wu Sheng’an is a classically trained master physician whose practice combines many traditional skills that are virtually impossible to find in Dr. Wu Sheng'anone person in modern-day China: chrono-acupuncturist, wildcrafter and processor of medicinal plants, internal medicine expert specializing in difficult and recalcitrant diseases, Taiji master, and active proponent of Sun Simiao’s medical ethics. In a medical practice that has spanned more than 50 years, Dr. Wu has synthesized core teachings of several historically renowned lineages into one highly effective and cohesive clinical system. In video lecture, Dr. Wu’s eldest son Wu Zhaoqing provides a practical and systematic introduction to the unique herbal approach of the Wu Sheng’an lineage.

Total running time: 134 mins
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf

A Synthesis of liujing bianzheng (Six Conformation Diagnostics) and the Practical Application of Shanghan lun Formulas (3 Parts)

2021-06-11T15:49:53-07:00Tags: , , , , |

ZENG RONGXIU
Five Branches University; National University of Natural Medicine, College of Classical Chinese Medicine

Dr. Zeng was a veteran physician from Chengdu (Sichuan) who specialized in the treatment of difficult and recalcitrant diseases with herbal formulas from the Shanghan lan and Jingui yaolüe. The simplicity of his clinical approach, combined with the fervent belief that all disease can be healed with natural methods, transmit the core essence of the practical aspects of classical Chinese medicine. Until his passing in 2014, he was living in retirement in Los Angeles and continued to teach students at Five Branches University and the College of Classical Chinese Medicine at National University of Natural Medicine.

Total running time: 178 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf

Guizhi – Cinnamon Twig (Translations)

2017-04-01T19:23:45-07:00Tags: , , , , |

BY HUANG GONGXIU, ZHANG XICHUN
(18th and 19th Centuries)

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Cinnamon twig primarily enters the muscle layer at the surface of the body. At the same time, it enters the heart and liver channels. It is the branch of the cassia tree which also yields cinnamon bark. Cinnamon twig is light, its nourishing essence is pungent, and its color is red (therefore its affinity to the heart). The action of cinnamon twig is rising without descending. Therefore, it can also enter the lung and facilitate uninhibited movement of qi, and enter the bladder channel and stimulate water metabolism.

INDIVIDUAL MONOGRAPHS

Fuzi – Aconite (Translations)

2017-04-01T19:25:07-07:00Tags: , , , , |

BY HUANG GONGXIU, ZHANG XICHUN
(18th and 19th Centuries)

TRANSLATED BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

Aconite primarily enters the vital gate of life (mingmen). Its nutritive essence is pungent and extremely hot. Aconite is purely yang in nature and thus toxic. Its function is to move being confined to one place, so it is known to move through all twelve channels, and there is no place in the body it can not reach.

INDIVIDUAL MONOGRAPHS

Excerpts from Zhang Xichun’s Materia Medica, in Chinese at Heart But Western Where Appropriate: Essays Investigating an Integrated Form of Medicine (Yixue Zhong Zhong Can Xi Lu, 1933)

2021-03-26T12:24:02-07:00Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

BY ZHANG XICHUN
(1960-1933)

INTRODUCED AND TRANSLATED
BY HEINER FRUEHAUF

This original translation explores the clinical efficacy of twelve important Chinese herbs, and gives an example of the highly personal and narrative way in which scholar clinicians used to relate to medicinal plants in the past. Selected from the herbal compendium of one of the last master physicians of the classical era of Chinese medicine.

Single Herbs Series: Guizhi and Rougui (Cinnamomum loureirii bark and twig)

2021-03-22T13:32:41-07:00Tags: , , , , , |

By Heiner Fruehauf Heiner Fruehauf’s prolific research trip to China and Vietnam in the summer of 2014 to source high quality, potent, directly-traded Chinese herbs from small family farms provided a significant amount of material and information about didao yocai and paozhi – terroir [...]

Understanding Cancer: Spiritual and Physical Reasons for Its Development and Complementary Treatment Strategies with Chinese Herbs (3 Parts)

2021-06-09T18:58:42-07:00Tags: , |

HEINER FRUEHAUF
National University of Natural Medicine,
College of Classical Chinese Medicine


Heiner Fruehauf found his way to the profession of classical Chinese medicine more than two decades ago while healing from cancer. Since then, he has explored many alternative cancer treatments and accumulated a host of information on how to accompany conventional treatments of cancer with Chinese herbs, Qigong, emotional therapy, and other modalities. In this multi-part lecture at his home in the Sandy River Gorge in Oregon, Heiner systematically shares his clinical approach to this difficult disorder.

Total running time: 148 mins.
English

Clinical Realizations of a Chinese Medicine Physician (2 Parts)

2021-06-11T12:03:17-07:00Tags: , , |

LU CHONGHAN
Associate Professor, Chengdu University of TCM

In this passionate video lecture, the main successor of the Sichuan “Fire Spirit” school of aconite, ginger, and cinnamon usage reveals the clinical secrets of his herbal lineage. In an unveiled challenge to the textbook parameters of TCM, Dr. Lu contents that support of yang-qi must override most superficial symptoms of heat and yin deficiency.

Total running time: 120 mins.
Mandarin Chinese with English subtitles

Shanghan lun (2 Parts)

2021-06-10T19:10:35-07:00Tags: , , , |

LIU LIHONG
Institute for the Research and Preservation of Classical Chinese Medicine, Guangxi University of TCM

Total running time: 92 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf

In this two-part video lecture, one of China’s premier experts on the Shanghan lun shares his unique insights into the nature of Zhang Zhongjing’s work and the clinical relevance of the six conformation approach in diagnosis and treatment.

The Foundation of Life: How to Ensure Clinical Success by Safeguarding the Yang (3 Parts)

2021-06-09T20:04:12-07:00Tags: |

LIU LIHONG
Institute for the Clinical Research of Classical Chinese Medicine, Guangxi College of TCM

In the final installment of this 3-part lecture series, Prof. Liu Lihong, the author of the best-selling book Sikao zhongyi (Rethinking Chinese Medicine) and one of the leading proponents of the so-called Fire School of Chinese herbalism, lays out in great detail the theoretical reasons for using the herbs aconite, cinnamon, and ginger as the keystone for the treatment of most chronic and severe illnesses.

Total running time: 180 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf

On the Concept of “Fang” (Formula Science): The Design and Clinical Power of Guizhi Tang (Cinnamon Decoction) (2 Parts)

2021-06-09T19:31:56-07:00Tags: , , , , |

LIU LIHONG
Institute for the Clinical Research of Classical Chinese Medicine, Guangxi College of TCM

In this educational presentation filled with important practical clinical information, Prof. Liu Lihong offers insight into "fang", or formula science. He utilizes guizhi tang (cinnamon decoction), one of the premier and most important formulas in Chinese herbalism, as the example to illuminate his lesson.

Total running time: 120 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf

King of 100 Herbs: The Central Role of Aconite in the Fire Spirit Lineage (3 Parts)

2021-06-10T12:46:30-07:00Tags: , , , |

LIU LIHONG
Institute for the Clinical Research of Classical Chinese Medicine, Guangxi College of TCM

Aconite plays a central role in the classical materia medica, yet is rarely used anymore by Chinese herbalists in modern clinical practice. Dr. Liu Lihong, China's most prominent proponent of yang tonic therapy and a formal disciple of the Fire Spirit Lineage of Southwest China illuminates the rich story of aconite in this lecture. He explains the reasons why it has become a forgotten herb, and what needs to be done to reclaim it as one of the most powerful healing substances in the treatment of difficult and recalcitrant diseases.

Total running time: 180 mins.
Mandarin Chinese, translated into English by Heiner Fruehauf

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